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Inside Eyetube.net | Sep 2013

This Month’s Videos on Eyetube.net

ARTISAN LENS EXPLANTATION, PHACOEMULSIFICATION WITH INSERTION OF A PRESBYOPIA-CORRECTING IOL, AND DSAEK FOR BULLOUS KERATOPATHY

http://eyetube.net/?v=narer

By Majid Moshirfar, MD; Adam Gess, MD; Valliammai Muthappan, MD; Lauren Imbornoni; and Erik Ostler

This group presents a multistepped procedure that includes removal of an Artisan lens (Ophtec BV), cataract extraction, placement of a presbyopia-correcting IOL, and Descemet-stripping automated endothelial keratoplasty.

PHACOEMULSIFICATION IN A PATIENT WITH TRUE EXFOLIATION SYNDROME

http://eyetube.net/?v=defeg

By Ali A. Mearza, MB, BS, FRCOphth; and Mohammed Ziaei, MBChB (Hons), FRCOphth

An 82-year-old patient presented with a complaint of reduced vision. During slit-lamp examination, she was found to have an extra layer of anterior capsule floating in the anterior chamber. No phacodonesis was demonstrable, despite bilateral 3+ nucleosclerotic cataracts. The rest of the ocular examination was normal. The patient underwent phacoemulsification under topical anesthesia. After creating a temporal clear corneal incision, the surgeon used VisionBlue (DORC International BV) to identify the extra layer of anterior capsule in the anterior chamber. The capsulorrhexis was carefully performed to ensure removal of the layer of capsule without leaving tags at the margin of the continuous curvilinear tear. The rest of the phaco procedure was unremarkable with in-the-bag implantation of a one-piece acrylic IOL (Rayner C-flex; Rayner Intraocular Lenses Ltd.).

CORNEAL FOREIGN BODY EXTRACTION

http://eyetube.net/?v=punee

By Majid Moshirfar MD; Valliammai Muthappan, MD; Lauren Imbornoni; Erik Ostler; Jared Smedley; and Christina Lippe

This group demonstrates the removal of a small, intracorneal foreign body that entered the eye of a 9-year-old boy during a sandstorm. The patient initially presented with sudden-onset foreign body sensation, redness, and sensitivity to light. He was diagnosed with peripheral ulcerative keratitis and treated with antibiotics and steroid drops. The patient was then referred to a cornea specialist. Dissection of the lesion revealed a small rock in the cornea.

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